Mathematics

Intent

At St. Gerard’s Catholic School, we strive towards ensuring that all our pupils develop a positive attitude towards Mathematics.

Mathematics is a life skill, it helps us to make sense of our world, providing a precise means of communication using numbers, symbols, and shapes. It is a powerful, universal language used to explain, predict, and represent events and tackle problems in everyday life.

The national curriculum for mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • To ensure that all pupils become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • To ensure that all pupils reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language.
  • To ensure that all pupils can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

Implementation

Whhite Rose Maths

At St Gerard’s Catholic Primary School, we are adapting a mastery approach to learning. Children are taught in mixed ability groupings, and all children access the same curriculum.

We have adopted the 'White Rose Maths' curriculum. This is a cumulative curriculum, so that once a topic is covered it is revisited and built upon many times in many contexts across the learners’ journey through the school.

Teachers begin lessons by revising and reviewing knowledge of concepts and skills to ensure they are embedded. Children are introduced to new concepts in small, logical steps.

Where children struggle, same day interventions and pre-teaching takes place to support learners. Where children are confident, they are challenged by reasoning and problem solving. We do not move on through the curriculum until children have grasped the concepts taught.

In KS1 and lower KS2, children are taught using the Concrete, Pictorial and Abstract approach to guide children through their understanding of mathematical processes:

  • Concrete – children can use concrete objects and manipulatives to help them understand and explain what they are doing.
  • Pictorial – children then build on this concrete approach by using pictorial representations, which can then be used to reason and solve problems.
  • Abstract – With the foundations firmly laid, children can move to an abstract approach using numbers and key concepts with confidence.

Where possible, links are made with other subjects across the curriculum as well as making connections outside of the classroom and to life experiences and enterprises, developing the children’s Cultural Capital.

Schemes of Learning

Mathematical Fluency of Number Facts

Numbots

Children from Reception onwards learn their number bonds to 10 and 20. In KS1, children use 'Numbots' to practise.

From Year 2 onwards, children learn their times table facts and are expected to have a working knowledge of the 2, 10 and 5 times tables by the time they move on to Key Stage 2.

Times Tables Rock Stars

By the end of Year 4, they should have a solid working knowledge of all the times tables as well as good recall of key mathematical facts.

In KS2, the children use 'Times Table Rockstars' for daily practice, and daily homework.

Impact

Children will become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics. Through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, pupils will have the conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.

  • Children will be able to reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language.
  • Children will solve problems by applying their mathematics in a variety of problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering to seek solutions.
  • Quick recall of facts and procedures.

A mathematical concept or skill has been mastered when a child can show it in multiple ways, using the mathematical language to explain their ideas, and can independently apply the concept to new problems in unfamiliar situations.